(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Foreign crops and markets"

Historic, archived document 



Do not assume content reflects current 
scientific knowledge, policies, or practices. 



L IB r a nvl 

RECEI v n t 



FOREIGN CROPS 

;_v i 



ISSUED WEEKjy, BY . 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Vol. 36 May 28, 1938 No. 21 



LATE CABLES... 

India May estimate of 1938 wheat acreage and produc- o cd w 
tion placed at 35,151,000 acres and 392,075,000 bushels, re- 

spectively, as against the revised May 1937 estimates of ° ^ " 

33,049,000 acres and 362,395,000 bushels and the final 1937 H 

estimates of 33,237,000 acres and 366,539,000 bushels. r , ^ 

(Director of Statistics, Calcutta.) ^ ^ 



London wool sales continue with general tone of market 



excellent for combing wool of all qualities, while clothing £j p 

wool remains steady. Compared with closing of preceding se- 6 



ries on March 10, prices were 5 percent higher for greasy f 
merinos while scoured merinos were at par. Fine greasy cross- o 
breds were 2.5 percent higher, medium and low greasy cross- 
breds 5 percent higher, fine scoured crossbreds at par, and 
medium and low scoured crossbreds 5 percent lower. Fine 
lamb's slipes were 7.5 percent and medium and low 10 percent 
lower. Fine sheep's slipes were 5 percent and medium and low 
7.5 percent lower. Merinos were bought chiefly by German, 
Russian, French, British, and Belgian bidders, while most of 
the crossbreds went to British, Belgian, and German buyers. 
(Agricultural Attache C. C. Taylor, London.) 

Sydney, Australia, wool sales opened on May 23 with 
keen competition from continental Europe, Japan, and York- 
shire. Compared with closing of preceding series on May 5, 
prices were unchanged except for short faulty fleece wool, 
for which market ruled in seller's favor. (Agricultural 
Attache C. C. Taylor, London.) 



314 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 36, No. 21 



Increase indicated in Nor thern Hemisph ere br eac _ grain acreage 

The 1938 wheat acreage reported in 23 countries to date is about 1.5 
percent larger than that reported for the same countries a year ago. Last 
year, these 23 countries accounted for about 89 percent of the total wheat 
acreage harvested in the Northern Hemisphere, excluding the Soviet Union 
and China, 

(The increase over the acreage actually harvested last year, however, 
is about 4 percent. The difference is accounted for by the unusually large 
abandonment of spring-wheat acreage in the United States during the summer 
of 1937.) 

Marked increases in the acreage this year have taken place in the 
United States, Germany, Portugal, Bumania, England and Wales, Egypt, and 
India. 

The 1938 rye acreage, as estimated for 13 Northern Hemisphere coun- 
tries, shows an increa.se of 2 percent. Canada and Yugoslavia are the 
only countries reporting a reduction from last season. Eor table of 
acreage estimates, see page 321. 

European crop condit i ons 

Rainfall during March and April was much below normal over most of 
west central Europe but about normal in eastern Germany, Poland, and the 
upper part of the Danube Basin, according to a cable from Assistant Agri- 
cultural Attache Gordon P. Boals at Berlin. Precipitation was rather 
general over Europe early in May and crops were temporarily benefited. 

In the Soviet Union official condition figures as of May 11 indi- 
cated that winter crops were satisfactory or good, except in the North- 
western Region. Spring cereals in the south were developing well but were 
backward in the northwest. High temperatures in the Volga Region appeared 
unfavorable, and rainfall during April and the first 10 days of May was 
insufficient in the southern and southeastern Steppes Region. 

Cold dry weather in April was unfavorable for the development of 
French grain crops, it was reported by cable from, the International insti- 
tute of Agriculture at Rome. Early in May wheat was yellowing, except on 
heavy soils. The sowing of spring grains went forward \rnder excellent 
conditions, but germination was slow and irregular. Condition reports on 
May 1 for winter wheat and winter rye in Germany and Czechoslovakia were 
considerably better than on the corresponding date of 1937. In Poland, 
they were estimated to be slightly below average, the sa,me as last year. 
Winter rye in Lithuania was not so good as last year but wheat much better. 
The reverse was noted for Switzerland. Plentiful rains early in May im- 
proved wheat prospects in Hungary, and the crop condition of winter grains 
in Bulgaria was reported to be good on May 16. Crop conditions were also 
reported generally good in Belgium as of May 18. 



May 28, 1938 Foreign Crops and Markets 315 



Ja panese cotton s it uation 

Japanese imports of raw cotton during April totaled 277,091 "bales, 
according to a report from American Consul Kenneth C. Krentz at Osaka to 
the Shanghai office of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics. April imports 
were substantially "below last year's figure of 459,000 bales, but with the 
exception of March imports, were the highest of any month since last August, 
During the first 8 months of the current season, Japanese imports of all 
growths have "been approximately 63 percent "below those of the comparable 
months of last season. Most of the decline has taken place in Indian, 
American, Egyptian, and miscellaneous growths. Imports of Chinese and 
Brazilian cotton hrve "been maintained at levels only slightly below these 
of last season. 



JAP AH: Raw cotton Imports, April 1938, with comparisons 
(In bales of 500 pounds) 



Growth 


; April 


Sep timber- Apr il 














1937 


1938 




1935-37 


1937-38 




: Bales 


Bales 




Bales 


Bales 




: 216,000 


122,90C 




1,248,000 


419 , 746 






59,904 


1,221,000 


369,324 






10,231* 


178,000 


49 , 746 






62 , 320 


164,000 


aj 150,128 






7,386 


122,000 


109,177 






14.344 


213.000 


83.988 






277,091 


3,146,000 


1,182,109 


Based on Japanese 


official and trade 


sources . 








a/ Ho figure given 


for November. 











It is reported that large shippers of cotton to Japan have some- 
what liberalized their recent requirements of payment before the cotton 
arrives at Japanese ports, as the Import Control Committee now insists 
that payment not be made until arrival of the cotton. It is understood 
that a number of shipments have been unloaded for which the necessary 
government authorization to importers to effect payment has not yet been 
received. Trade opinion inclines to the view that exchange permits will 
be forthcoming to cover cotton arrived or afloat for which payment has 
not yet been made, as stocks are extremely low and mills are forced to 
rely largely upon current arrivals. On the other haiid, it is believed 
that delay in granting foreign exchange to cover these shipments may fore- 
cast government action to force a reduction of mill production, unless ex. 
port trade reaches higher levels. 



< 



316 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 36, No. 21 



Imports of Indian cotton during April were sharply under the March 
figure. This decline may "be attributed partly to increased arrivals of 
Chinese cotton, which displaces to some extent Indian and low-grade American 
growths. Another factor in the decline in imports of Indian cotton is 
probably the inability of Indian shippers to extend credit until arrival of 
cotton in Japan, as Indian shipments are made to a considerable extent by 
small or medium-sized firms, whose credit facilities are limited. Imports 
and distribution of Chinese cotton are being encouraged and arrivals are 
said to be immediately apportioned to mills by the Control Committee, and 
mills are not permitted to take up other cotton which may have been ordered 
until they have taken their quota of current Chinese arrivals. 

Further reports indicate that the Control Committee has decided 
to require the importation of about 215,000 beJ.es of Brazilian cotton be- 
fore December 31, 1938. Of this total, about, 150,000 bales are to be sub- 
ject to the terms now imposed on other imports, i.e., payment on arrival 
at Japanese ports. The balance, of approximately 65,000 bales, of Brazilian 
cotton is to be obtained from Japanese colonization companies in Brazil, 
with payment for this cotton to be made before shipments leave Brazil. 

Japanese exports of piece goods during April totaled 206,612,000 yards, 
which is about 10 percent less than exports in March but approximately 10 
percent more than those for April 1937. Exports of piece goods during the 
first 8 months ( September- Apr il) of the 1937-38 season have totaled 
1,745,000,000 yards, only slightly less than the total of 1,760,000,000 
yards exported during the corresponding months of the 193 6-37 season. 

JAPAN: Warehouse stocks of raw cotton, April 1938, with comparisons 
(in bales of 500 pound s) 



1937 ' ! 1938 



Growth 


April 


Mar ch 


April 




Bales 


Bales 


Bales 


United States 

Indian 

Egyptian 

Chinese 

Brazilian 

Other 

Total 


461,000 

298,000 

36,000 

21,000 

5,000 
50,000 


49 , 890 
59,506 
5,863 
26,121 

1,467 
9.996 


68,863 
45 , 026 
3,054 
38,016 
583 


871,000 


152,843 


167,995 



Estimates from trade sources in Japan. 



May 23, 1938 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



317 



United States exports of fresh pears nr-ar record 

The 2,663,000 "bushels of fresh pears exported from the United 
States in the 9-month period, July through March, are only 30,000 "bushels 
below the total for the record 1930-31 season. It is entirely possible 
that exports in the remaining 3 months of the season will amount to as 
much as 60,000 bushels. If so, exports during the present season will 
set a new record. Shipments to the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, 
Sweden, Belgium, Germany, Egypt, and' Tunisia showed appreciable increases. 
Exports to France were reduced because of the decline in the value of the 
franc and the competition from local fruit. The large puar crop in Canada 
caused a reduction of exports to that country. Exports to date this season 
are almost 40,000 bushels greater than the total shipments last season. 

PEAPS: Exports from the United States by principal countries, 
July through March, 1936-37 and 1937-38 



Country 



1936-37 



1,000 bushels 



United Kingdom 

Netherlands 

Germany 

France 

Belgium 

Sweden 

Norway , 

Finland 

Other Europe 

Total Europe 

Canada 

Newfoundland and Labrador. 

Panama 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Palestine 

Egypt 

Tunisia 

Others 

Total excluding Europe, 
Total all countries 



,064 
' 115 
23 

385 
20 

120 
6 
26 



,236 
,299 
,762 
,563 
,503 
,409 
,712 
,149 
,475 



,128 



554 



( 

21 

8 

104 
41 
50 
5 
S3 



,745 
971 
,968 
, 323 
,145 
,267 
, 552 
,255 
,929 
,401 
,5Pn 



6-10,141 



2.607,269 



1937-38 



1,000 bushels 

1,193,349 
135,492 
59,240 
361,146 
51,194 
153,291 
8,186 
27,856 
2,794 



-2,548 



351,899 
1,275 
8,457 
12,298 
26 , 542 
6,744 
91.341 
26,740 
79,275 
20 , 248 
45 , 203- 



r 0,522 



2,663,070 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Com- 
merce. 



318 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 36, No 



Record exp ort s of f resh gra pe s f romJJhi ted States 

Exports of fresh grapes from the United States totaled 34,859 short 
tons^ in the first 9 months of the 1937-38 season compared with 23,058 tons 
in the same months last season. The figures shown constitute the "bulk 
of the exports for the season. The previous record was established in 
1928-29 when 27,819 tons were exported. Canada and the United Kingdom 
•are the chief outlets. The increase in exports is explained "by the heavy 
shipments to the United Kingdom, which amounted to 10,630 tons compared 
with 4,210 tons last season. Exports to Canada, the most important out- 
let, also shewed an increase. In 1936-37 exports tc Canada amounted to 
12,275 tons against 14,763 this season. Other important markets were 
Mexico, Cuba, Brazil, Philippine Islands, and Sweden. 



GRATES, FRESH: Exports from the United States "by principal countries, 
July, through, March, 1936-37 .and. 3 937-3 .8 , _ 



Country 



1936-37 



' 1937-38 



United Kingdom ; 

Sweden :> 

Norway ■ 

Finland ; 

Netherlands ; 

Germany ■ 

Other Europe : 

Total Europe ; 

Canada, ; 

Mexico | 

Cuba ; 

Panama. j 

Brazil ■ 

British India '• 

British Malaya : 

Ceylon : 

Hong Kong ; 

Netherlands Indies ; 

Philippine Islands i 

New Zealand ; 

Others j 

Total excluding Earope ' 

Total all countries ; 

Compiled from official records of the 
merce . 

a/ Less than one-half ton. 



S hor t t ons 

4,210 
414 
147 
182 
3 

a/ 



934 



12,275 
738 
841 
240 
593 
210 
410 
256 
305 
123 
698 
■ 357 

_JUQ28_ 



18.074 



23,058 



Short tons 



10, 



630 
671 
465 
377 

64 

79 
& 



12 .286 



14, 763 
1,644 
1,177 
252 
922 
215 
597 
336 
278 
126 
906 
412 
945 



22, 573 



34,859 



Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Com- 



May 28, 1938 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



319 



Large orange crop expected in Brazil 

The orange crop in Brazil is earlier than usual and at least as 
large as the 1937 crop, according to a report in the Weekly Fruit Intel- 
ligence Notes for May 4. The trees are in better condition in Sao Paulo 
than in previous years and the quality of the fruit is "better than usual. 
The weather has also "been very favorable in the growing areas adjacent 
to Rio de Janeiro. More attention is being given to packing and grading, 
since greater facilities are available this year. Around 2 million boxes 
are expected to be exported fron Sao Paulo, of which about half will go 
to the United Kingdom. Around 3 million boxes of oranges are expected to 
go from Rio de Janeiro to foreign countries. Prospects point to ex- 
ports of 1.5 million boxes to the United Kingdom. A compulsory inspection 
law covering export products was passed in Brazil on March 15 to estab- 
lish definite quality standards for export. Presumably, this law will be 
applied to citrus-fruit exports. 

Mexican lime crop moves to market 

The first shipment of fresh limes of the 1938 season moved out of 
Guadalajora, Mexico, during the last week of April, states James R. 
Riddle, American consul at Jalisco. Opening prices averaged $1.36 per 
box of 60 pounds. The 1938 crop is reported to be a fairly good one. 

Europe will require more American lard 

A greater need in Europe for American lard is expected to develop 
during the coming summer and autumn, according to Agricultural Commis- 
sioner H. E. Reed at London. United States exports of lard to European 
markets in the first quarter of 1938 totaled 35,753,000 pounds against 
10,711,000 pounds in the corresponding 1937 period. Most of the exports 
were taken by Great Britain. The increase over 1937 is attributable pri- 
marily to larger supplies this year in the United States and lower ex- 
port prices. For the next few months, however, reduced European supplies 
are expected to become increasingly important among the factors affecting 
United States lard exports. 

The decline in European hog slaughter during the last half of 1937 
continued during the first quarter of 1938. There has been an increased 
slaughter in the minor Baltic and Danube exporting countries, but that 
tendency has failed to offset the declines noted in important hog-produc- 
ing countries of Western and Central Europe. Hog census data show that 
the low point in total European hog numbers probably was reached this 
spring and that breeding operations have turned upward. The figures also 
show, however, that the low point in European slaughter will not be reached 
until the late summer and autumn of this year. 



320 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 36, No. 21 



United States lard is recovering its prominent position in the 
British market, following the losses resulting from the American droughts 
of 1934 and 1936. luring recent months, only .the United -States, Canada, 
and. Argentina have supplied significant quantities of lard to the British 
market. British imports of United States lard in the first 3 months of 
1938 represented 78.5 percent of imports from all sources .against 28 
percent in the first quarter of 1937 and 39.2 percent in 1936. 

Czech oslo vak ^Livesto ck numbers increas e 

Considerable increases in all livestock numbers were registered 
in Czechoslovakia during 1937, according to the' January 1, 1938, census 
as reported by American Consul General K. P. Potter, At Prague. Kog 
numbers showed the greatest gain, 11 percent over the 1937' census figures, 
and more than 42 percent above those for 1925. Brood-sow numbers showed 
only a slight increase, however. Breeding of hogs depends to a great 
extent upon the crops of barley, potatoes, and corn; and present price 
tendencies indicate that the hog-feed ratio will' di scourage' increased 
feeding operations, at least until after the 1938 harvest. 

Cattle numbers also showed advances over both 1937 and 1925 census 
figures, largely as a result of favorable fodder crops in 1936 and 1937. , 
Gains were less significant in milk cows than in other categories of cat- 
tle. Sheep numbers declined consistently from 1925 to 1933. Since 1933, 
they have shown a slight upward tendency but are still 25 percent below 
1925 figures. Goat numbers continue the advance made since 1933 and are 
now only 10 percent below those recorded in 1925. 

CZECHOSLOVAKIA : Livestock numbers, January 1, 1925 and 1931 to 1938 



Year . 


Cattle ; 


Hogs 


Sheep • 


Goats ■ 


**■•*•«••••••*••*•• 


4,691,320 : 


2,539,201 


861,128 ..' 


1,244,701 


1931 


4,457,522 


2, 776,215 


607,612 




1932. . . 


4,450,965 


2,575,921 


531,125 




1933 


4,341,351 


2,621,235 


455,093 


876,771. 


1934. . . . .' 


4,404,.796 


3,429,919 


475,881 


929,631 


1935. 


4,304,529 


3,031,846 


510,101 


957,111 


1936. .. ......... 


4,283,071 


2,744,745 


; 547,050 


1,000,221 


1937 


4,595,592 


.3,242,158 


i 591,807 


1,071,844 


1938 a/ 


; 4,930,046 


■ 3, 610,616 


• 642,383 , 


, 1,115,010 









a/ Preliminary. 



May 23, 1938 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



321 



WHEAT AND RYE: 



Acreage reported for 19^5 crop, 
with comparisons 



Count iy 
and 
.c ommodit y 



Wheat 
United States: 
V/inter 

Spring, 

Total 



Canada: 
Winter . 
Spring. 
Total. 



France §y 
C z e ch o s 1 o vakia 
Poland fj. . , 

Greece 

Italy 

Belgium fj . . 
Germany fj . . 
Portugal. . . . 
England and 

Wales 

Lithuania fj 
Luxemburg f 
Bulgaria f 
Hungary fj 
Rumania fj 
Yugoslavia fj 

Algeria 

igypt 

Morocco 

Tunisia 

India (May 

estimate) . . . 
Japan 

Total (23).. 













Percentage 




1936 


: 1937 




1938 


i 1938 












i is of 1 SvS7 




1 , oco 


• 1,000 




1,000 






acres 


' acre.s 




acres 


; Percent 


b/ 


37,667 


46, 946 




50, 677 


• 107.9 


23,959 


b/ 23.750 


! / 


22,282 


; 93. 8 


61 , 646 


70 , 69 6 
• 




72,959 


j 103.2 




509 


d/ 719 


%l 




613 


: 85.3 


a,/ 


25. 09c 


a/ 24.851 


. l 
ft 


24, 106 


97.0 




25 , 605 


25 , 5 70 




24, 719 


95.7 




12,536 


12, 772 




12,353 


; 96. 7 




2,296 


2,107 




2,135 


101.3 




3,736 


3, 73 o 




3, 781 


101.2 




2,065 ; 


2,118 




2,055 


97.0 




12,737 


12,905 




12,439 


96.4 




420 . 


422 




428 


101.4 




4,758 


4, 3^0 


'.„/ 

r 


4,507 . 


104.0 




1,157 


1 , Ovd 


1,310 ; 


120.0 




1 , 704 : 


i, 732 




1,807 ' 


104.3 




349 ■ 


379 




357 


94.2 




44 < 


A CZ 

45 




45 


100.0 




2,941 : 


2,845 




2,874 ; 


100.0 




4,028 : 


3 , 726 




4,139 j 


101.0 




7,720 ; 


H Q £. O 
( , V D ( 




d a o rf * 


11L). o 




5,456 ; 


5,342 




5,223 


97.8 




4,287 i 


4,311 




4,139 


96.0 




1,464 : 


1 , 421 




■1,470 : 


103.4 




3,194 ; 


3,027 


y 


3,089 : 


•• 102.0 




1,221 • 


2,429 




1,310 


• 53.9 




33,494 : 


33,049 




35,151 i 


106.4 




1.658 ' 


1.776 




1 . 757 : 


98.9 


194,546 


205 , 803 




206,874 ' 


101.5 



Continued - 



322 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 36, No, 



WHEAT AND RYU: Acreage reported for 1938 crop, 
with comparisons, cont'd 



Country 



CillLL 


. ±yot> 


1 d<5 ( 




1 O f ZO 


r~> r\ jy\ tti /~v /~i t Ttr 

uomino cii oy 








is of 1937 




1,000 


1,000 




1 ,000 






! acres 


acres 


acres 


Percent 


Kye 










United States. a/ 


2, 774 


. 3,839 


4,059 


105.7 




625 


894 


c/ 662 


74.0 




1,611 


1,620 


1,621 


100. 1 


■Czechoslovakia, 


2,510 


2,413 


. 2,453 


• 101.7 


Poland f/ 


14,346 


14,075 


14,470 


102.8 




160 


160 


171 


106.9 




385 


375 


380 


101.3 




11,006 


10,122 


10,283 


101.6 


Li thuania f / . , . 


1 , 207 


1 , 251 


1,327 


106.1 


Luxemburg f / . . . 


19 


15 


15 


100.0 


Bulgaria f/'. . . . 


457 


426 ; 


436 


102.3 


Rumania f/. .... 


1,021 


1,052 


1,102 


104.8 


Yugoslavia f / . . 


551 


544 


530 


97.4 


Total (13) 


36,672 


35,787 


37,509 j 


102.0 



Percentage 



a/ For harvest, b/ Sown area, c/ Intended area, d/ Harvested area, e/ 
Sowings to January 1. f/ Winter acreage only, g/ Estimate of Paris of- 
fice, h/ Estimate of Belgrade office. 



INDIA: Wheat acreage and production, 1933-1938 



Year of 
harvest 



Acreage 



May 
estimate 



Final 
estimate 



Production 



May 
estimate 



Final 
estimate 



1933. . 
1934. . 
1935. . 
1936. . 
1937. . 
1938. . 



1,000 acre s 

32,724 
35, 799 
34 , 482 
33,494 
33,049 
35, 151 



1 ,000 acre s 

32,976 
36,077 
34,490 
33 , 639 
33 , 237 



1,000 bushels 



347,872 
352,091 
368,144 
349,813 
362,395 
392,075 



1,000 bushel s 

352,987 
349,813 
363,216 
351,680 
366,539 



Director of Statistics, Calcutta. 



May 28, 1938 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



323 



WHEAT: Closing Saturday prices of July futures 



Pate 


Chicago 


Kansas City 


Minneapolis 


Winnipeg a/ 


Liverpool a/ 


Buenos 
Airi„s b / 




1937 


1938 


1937 


1938 


1937 


1938 


1937 


1938 


19?7 


1938 


1937 : 1^33 


High c/. 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Gents 


Cents; Cents 


130 


83 


125 


78 


141 


92 


145 


115 


154 


103 


126 ; d/ 99 


Low c7". . 


115 


77 


112 


73 


124 


82 


124 


101 


131 


95 


117 j d/ 88 


Apr.~30. 


120 


79 


116 


75 


130 


87 


131 


110 


137 


99 


120 j d/ 99 


May 7. . . 


117 


80 


113 


76 


126 


86 


128 


108 


137 


99 


122 i a/ 98 


14. . . 


118 


78 


115 


75 


127 


85 


130 


105 


138 


97 


120 : a/ 92 


21. . . 


122 


77 


119 


73 


132 


83 


133 


104 


143 


95 


120 •' a/ 38 



a/ Co?.versions at noon buying rate of exchange, b/ 
other prices, cj April 1 to aate. d/ June future's. 



b/ Prices are of aay previous to 



WHEAT: Weekly weighted average cash price at statoa market! 





All classes 


No. 


2 


No. 


- 

X 


No. 


3 Hard 


No. 


2 


Western 


Week 


ana graaes 


Kara Winter 


Dk.N. 


Spring 


Amber 


Durum 


Red Winter 


White 


enaea 


six markets 


Kansa 


s City 


Minneapoli s 


Minneapolis 


St. Louis 


Seattle a/ 




1937 


1938 


1937 


1938 


3 937 


193 p 


1937 


1933 


1937 


1933 


1937 


1933 


High b/. 


Cents 


Cent? 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cen t s 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cent s 


150 


105 


144 


105 


170 


131 


206 


112 


147 


102 


122 


91 


Low tj. . 


130 


83 


130 


81 


142 


104 


125 


89 


131 


78 


110 


79 


Apr.~30. 


132 


84 


134 


83 


150 


108 


125 


101 


136 


83 


117 


80 


May 7 . . . 


133 


84 


136 


81 


142 


113 


128 


93 


135 


80 


118 


80 


14. . . 


130 


85 


130 


82 


146 


106 


128 


89 


131 


80 


112 


79 


21 . . . 


132 


63 


132 


32 


147 


104 


130 


89 




78 


118 





date. 



WHEAT: Price per bushel at specified European markets, 1936-37 and 1937-38 



beginning 
July 


Range 


Hard 
Winter 


Manitoba 
No. 3 


Argentina 
a/ 


Australia 

w 


Berlin - 
c/ . 


and 
Wales 






No. 2 


Domestic 


1935-37 d/ . 




— -■--) 

Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


High 


e/ 154 


165 


150 


150 


233 


131 


1937-38 d/. 


Low 


e/ 101 
e/ 148 


99 


99 


100 


209 


91 


High 


150 


146 


149 


225 


132 


Week ended 


Low 


e/ 102 


127 


106 


99 


208 


101 


Apr . 7 . . . 




e/ 102 


136 


108 


99 


222 


101 


14. . . 




e/ 105 
e/ 107 


137 


109 


100 


222 


101 


21 . . . 




136 


109 


• 107 


222 


103 


28. . . 




e/ 105 


130 


107 


105 


222 


105 


. May 5... 




e/ 102 


127 


106 


106 


222 


106 



Prices in England and Wales 
current exchange rates, a/ 
August 16, 1934. d/ July~l 



are for week ending Saturday. Conversions made at 
3 s russo. b/ F.A.Q. c/ Producer's fixed price from 
to date, e/ Nominal. 



324 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 36, No. 21 



FEED GRAINS AND RYE: Weekly average price per bushel of corn, rye, 
oats, and "barley at leading markets a/ 











Corn 




Bye , 


Oats 


Earley 


Week 


Chicago 


.-. - - 

-Buono sAi res 


Minneapoli s 


Chicago 


Minneapoli 


ended 


No 


3 


Futures 


Futures 


No . 


2 


No 


. 3 ■ 


No . 


2 




Fellow 










White 








1937 


,1938 


1937 


1938 


iQ77'iq %p, 

JLJt^ ( > J." oo 


■ 1937 


1938 


1937 ;1933 


1937 


1938 


High b/ 


Cent s 


■Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents ; 0 ent s 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


: Cents 


Cents 


Cent 


138 


i 61 


133 


62 


58 ; 66 


117 


77 


55 


: 34 


137 


83 




108 


! 57 


105 


57 


48 ; 64 


105 


59 


49 


• 29 


109 


66 




July 


July 


July ; June 




136 


; 58 


117 


61 


55 : 64 


103 


63 


55 


i 32 


118 


72 


30 


136 


58 


117 


60 


54 ; 65 


108 


60 


54 


: 30 


126 


70 


May 7 


138 


• 58 


119 


61 


55 ! 65 


110 


59 


53 


1. 29 


122 


73 


14, 


130 


59 


117 


60 


55 ; 64 


105 


59 


51 


i 30 


117 


72 




13? 


59 ' 


120 


59 


55 : 68 


110 


59 


52 


: 30 


109 


66 



a/ Cash prices are 



weighted averages of r 



ported sales; future prices are simple 



averages of daily quotations, b/ For period January 1 to latest date shown. 

FEED GRAINS: Movement from principal exporting countries 



Commodity 
and 
country 


Exports 
for year 


Shipments 1938,. 
v;eok ended a/ 


Exports as far 
as reported 


1935-36 


1936-37 


May 7 


May 14 


May 21 


July 1 
to 


1936-37 

w 


1937-38 
V . 


BARLEY , EXPORTS : c 
Danube & U.S.S.R. 


1 , 000 
/"bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


May 21 

Apr. 30 

May 21 
May 21 


1,000 
"bushels 


1,000 
"bushels 


9,886 
6,882' 
9,994 
41 , 090 

67,652 


5 1 1 53 
18, 880 
14,668 
26, 315 


34 

326 
250 


9 

23 
50 


24 

23 
83 


5,123 
16,541 
14,262 
25, 035 


9,886 

11,30c 

9, 334 
19,326 


65.016 










60,961 


49,854 


OATS, EXPORTS: o/ 
Danube & U.S.S.R. 


1,429 
15,615 
10,855 

1,390 


912 
10, 690 
24,600 

940 


2 

675 
0 


3 

28 
0 


27 

0 

0 


May 21 
Apr. 30 
May 21 
May 21 


685 
9,298 
21,346 
810 


8,682 
7,194 
27,85C 
16C 


29,289 


37,142 










32,3-39 


43,88| 


CORN, EXPORTS: d/ 
United States .... 
Danube & U.S.S.R. 


867 
14,321 
297,337 
10,239 


432 
25,835 
401,722 
23.146 


3,201 
1,242 
1,217 

o 


3, 580 
1 , 337 
1,083 

0 


5,577 
583 
984 
0 


Oct.l to 

May 21 
May 21 
May 21 
May 21 


255 
20,527 
254,724 
4,530 


61,89] 
5,355 
79, 76f 
20, 95c 




322,814 


451,135 










230,036 


167, 98C 


United States 


21,089 


103,643 








Mar. 31 


42, 336 


1,654 



Compiled from official and trade sources, a/ The weeks shown in these columns are 
nearest to the date shown, b/ Preliminary, cj Year beginning July 1 .. d/ Year 
beginning October 1. 



■May 26, 1938 



r oreign Crops and Markets 



325 



EXCHANGE RATES: Average weekly and monthly values in New York of 
specified currencies, May 21, 1933, with comparisons a/ 



Country 



Monetary 
unit 



Month 



/eek ended 



197f 



193? 



At. r . 



1938 



Mar 



1938 



May 



May 
14 



May 
21 



lents 



Cents 



Argentina. . 

Canada 

China 

Denmark. . . . 
England. '. ; . 

Franc e 

Germany". . . 

Italy 

J apan'. 
Mexico . . . . 
Netherlands 

No rway 

Sweden ..... 



Paper pe 
Dollar. . 
Shang. y 
Krone 
round 
Franc 
Eeichsma 
Lira. . . 
Yen. . . . 
Peso . . . 
Guilder 
Krone. . 
Krona. . 
■Eranc . . 



- : 



•aan 



rk 



32.95 
99.50 
29 .73 
22.06 
494.27 

6.59 
40.24 

7.69 

28.87 

27.77 

67.89 

24 . 83 

25.48 
32.58 



32.77 
100.12 
29.71 
21 .94 
491.63 
4.50 
40.21 
5.26 
28.64 
27.75 
54.76 
24.70 
25.34 
22.82 



33.45 
100.02 
29.60 
22.40 
501 . 80 
3.28 
40.42 
5.26 
29.03 
27 . 75 
55 . 96 
25 . 21 
25.66 



Cents 
33.23 
99.72 
28.22 
22.25 
493.45 

3.12 
40.24 

5.26 
28.86 
25.60 
55.56 
25.04 
25.67 
23 . 04 



Cents 



Uents 



Cents 



33.21 
99.45 
26.91 
22.24 
498.12 

3.10 
40.20 

5.26 
29.01 
23.11 
55,56 
25.03 
25.67 
22.99 



33.25 
99 .44 
26.06 
22.27 
498.82 

2.90 
40.21 

5.26 
29.06 
22.92 
55.62 
25.06 
25.71 



66.1b 
99.32 
24.50 
22.20 
497 . 37 

2.80 
40.16 

5.26 
28.98 
22.77 
55.37 
24.99 

25.63 
22.83 



Cents 
33.11 
99.12 
22.55 
22.16 
496 . 45 

2.79 
40.15 

5.26 

28.92 

22.51 

55.31 

24.94 

25.59 
22. 62 



Federal Reserve Board, a/ Noon "buying rates for c c 



le transfers 



WL=A.T, INCLUDING FLOUR: Shipments from principal exporting countries, 



h- 

Country 


Total 
shipments 


Shipments 1938, 
week ended 


Shipments 
July 1-May 21 


1935-36. 1935-37 


May 7 


May 14; May 21 


1936-37: 1937-36 


North America a/ 

Canada . 4 marke t s "b / . . . 

United States c/ 

Argentina. 

U.S.S.R 

Danube and Bulgaria d/. 
British 

India 

fetal f/ 


1,000 : 1,000 
bushels' bushels 


1 , 000 

bushels 


1,000 
bushel s 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


220,464 225,902 
246,199! 194,531 
7,219 10,049 
73,312. 164,678 
110,576 105,836 
29,024 83 
8,312 65,544 
e / - te ! 

2.556. 14.674 


3,815 
1,757 
2,551 
1,484 
3,784 
200 
272 

144 


3,691 
2,356 
2,278 
1,018 
5, 252 

240 
176 

120 


3,254 
1,518 
1,469 
1,322 
2,861 
£8 
360 

0 


205,400 
180,813- 

7o,657 
156,314 

89,292 
88 

59 , 592 

. . - 1 » 


162,105 
76,726 
8,346 
58,938 

112,053 
40,120 
35,726 

12.566 








520.116 


421. 530 


Total European 


360.274! ^64.600 


8.128 






, , — i 

si 

411.950 


el 

341.136 


Total ex-European 


131.760 127.192 


1.672 






fl2 r 944 


SI 

°82.iee_ 



Compiled from official arid trade sources, a' Broomhall's Corn Trade News, 
b/ Port William, Port Arthur, Vancouver, Prince Rupert, and New Westminster, 
c/ Official reports received from 16 principal ports, only, d/ Black Sea ship- 
ments only, ey Official, f/ Total of trade figures includes North America as 
reported by Broomhall. gj To May 7. 



326 



.Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vpi. 36, No. 21 



Index 



Page 

Late cables,.... 313 : 



Cotton: ; 

Imports, Japan, April 193? 315 : 

Stocks, Japan, April 193? ........ 1 

Exchange rates, foreign, 

May 21, 1938 .. 325 

Grains : 

Crop condition, Europe, May 1 93 ? • 3^ 
Movement (feed) , principal 

countries, May 21, .1938. ...... . 32U 

Prices (feed), principal markets, 
May 21, 1932.". ................ . 

Grapes (fresh), exports, U.S., 

' July-March 1937-38. 3 18 

Lard, export prospects, U t S», 1938 f 3^9 
Limes, shipments, Mexico, 

April 1933 319 

Livestock, numbers, 

Czechoslovakia, 1925,1931-1933... 320 
Oranges, crop prospects, Brazil, 

May 1938./..^./. 319 



' ■ '/' ' Page 

Pears (fresh), exports, U.S., 

July-March, 1937-38 317 

Rye: ; , . . 

Area, specified countries, 

I936-I938. . . 31^,322 

Prices, U.S., May 21, 1938 32U 

Wheat: 
Area: 

India, l ri 33-1938 ......... . 313,322 

Specified coiintries, 

1936-1938 ............. "... 31^, 320 

Crop condition, Europe, 

May '1938 3lU 

Prices, specified markets, 

May 2l/l933... 323 

Shipments, principal countries, 

May 21, 193S../. ... 325 

Wool: ... 
.Sales: 

London, May 20, 193?* 313 

Sydney, Australia, 

May 23, 1938 .313